Current
Visitors
24
COVER PAGE
PREVIOUS
DISPLAY
 Related Articles
7MFARM.COM
AVOIDING VACCINATION KNOTS
B S E IN A FRENCH GOAT?
B S E UPDATE 2006-01-23
BACK TO BASICS ~ VACCINATIONS
BIO - AGENT PARASITE CONTROL
BLOAT
CAE
CAE - NEW TEST
CASEOUS LYMPHADENITIS (CL)
CASTRATING
CATTLE TB
CHLAMYDIA ABORTION
CL - CONFIRMED
CL - WHAT & HOW
COMMON DISEASES
CUT-N-TACKUP IN THE BARN
DIARRHEA
DRAWING A GOAT'S BLOOD
EXTERNAL PARASITES
F A T G O A T S
FALL BREEDING
FIXING FOLDED EARS
FLOPPY KID SYNDROME
FMD INFORMATION
GAMBLING ON THE MARKET
GOAT MEDICINES
GONE FISHING
HOOF ROT
HOOF TRIMMING
JOHNE'S DISEASE CHROMOSOMES
KEEP IT CLEAN - DISINFECTANTS
LISTERIOSIS FACT SHEET
LIVESTOCK STRESS
MAXIMIZING VACCINE BENEFITS
MEAT GOAT HOME STUDY COURSE ANNOUNCED BY PENN STATE
MED EQUIPMENT
MEXICAN CATTLE WATCH!
MORE B S E TESTING
NORTH AMERICAN BSE CONFERENCE
OFF LABLE USE OF ANIMAL MEDICATIONS
ORF - SOREMOUTH
OUR GOATS' WORST ENEMY
PLANT POISIONING
POISONOUS PLANTS
Q FEVER
QUARANTINE - DEER & ELK
QUARTERLY SHEEP & GOAT HEALTH REPORT
RECOGNIZING SOREMOUTH
REPORT ANIMAL HEALTH PROBLEMS
SCRAPIE - TEXAS PROPOSED RULE
SELENIUM MAP(SAANENDOAH.COM)
SHEEP & GOAT HEALTH REPORT
SWINE INFLUENZA INFORMATION
TAHC EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS
TAHC PRESS RELEASE - ANTHRAX
TAHC PRESS RELEASE - FMD
TAKE CARE OF THE LGDS
TB BULL - TAHC ASKS FOR HELP!
TEXAS SCRAPIE REQUIREMENTS
TICK FEVER QUARANTINE
UNRINARY CALCULI - WORST ENEMY
URINARY CALCULI
V S CONFIRMED IN TEXAS
VACCINATION
VACCINATION FAILURE
VACCINE HANDLING
VACCINE QUALITY ASSURANCE
VACCINE STORAGE
WHAT IS FAMACHA?
WHAT IS M U M S ?
WINTER MANAGEMENT
WYOMING TO TEXAS HAULING

Texas "Fences Out" Colorado Deer and Elk

Subject: 
   Date: 
        Thu, 29 Nov 2001 17:33:16 -0600

NEWS RELEASE
Texas Animal Health Commission
Box l2966 *Austin, Texas 78711 *(800) 550-8242* FAX (512) 719-0719
Linda Logan, DVM, PhD* Executive Director
Contact Carla Everett, information officer, at 1-800-550-8242, ext. 710
ceverett@tahc.state.tx.us

For Immediate Release--

Texas animal health officials have shut the door on the importation of live
elk and several species of deer from Colorado after cases of Chronic
Wasting Disease (CWD), a fatal, degenerative brain disease of elk and deer,
were confirmed earlier this fall in farmed elk herds in that state. CWD
belongs to the family of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or TSEs,
Other similar, but unique diseases, include BSE, or bovine spongiform
encephalopathy, which affects cattle; and scrapie, a disease that can
affect sheep and goats.

"The TAHC issued the quarantine on the entire state of Colorado,
prohibiting the entry into Texas of live elk, mule deer, white-tailed and
black-tailed deer.  The quarantine is to prevent exposure to CWD and will
remain in effect until it is modified or rescinded by the 12-member TAHC
commission. The restrictions do not include hunter-killed animals," said
Dr. Linda Logan, Texas state veterinarian and head of the TAHC.  Texas has
not had a case of CWD, and we want to provide as much protection against
this disease as possible, while maintaining safe marketing and movement
opportunities."

"The TAHC quarantine on Colorado was redundant until late November, when
Colorado animal health officials lifted a movement ban that had been in
place on domestic elk since October. Colorado officials will continue to
restrict the movement of animals from quarantined facilities and any
domestic elk that originate in the northeast corner of the state, where the
disease is endemic.

Dr. Wayne Cunningham, Colorado state veterinarian, said his staff has
nearly completed the disease investigation. As of end of November, they
have detected 11 positive elk, resulting in the quarantine of nine herds,
involving about 1,550 animals. The infected herds will be depopulated,
beginning in the non-endemic area of Colorado.

Veterinarians from the Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC), the state's
livestock health regulatory authority, also have traced a dozen elk that
were imported to Texas from two of the Colorado herds, prior to the
detection of disease.

"Colorado officials acted swiftly to notify other states when they
confirmed disease in the herds. Although this is extremely unfortunate,
it's an indication that the detection and reporting system works among
states, and we're handling this issue quickly to prevent potential exposure
to Texas hoof stock," said Dr. Logan.  "It should be noted that the
ranchers who had imported the elk to Texas complied with all health
regulations."

Dr. Logan said, before being imported into Texas, deer and elk must meet a
number of health requirements.  Besides entry permits, the animals must
have had a certificate of veterinary inspection issued within the previous
30 days, meet stringent tuberculosis testing requirements and test negative
for brucellosis, a bacterial disease that can affect cattle.  The deer and
elk also must come from a state with a CWD program that requires disease
reporting and which imposes movement restrictions on suspicious or positive
herds.  If the animals originate in a state that  has CWD in its wildlife,
the animals must come from a herd enrolled in a CWD monitoring program for
at least a year.

"We've located all of  the imported elk, 11 of which were moved to a ranch
in the Panhandle, and the 12th animal, which was sent to a facility in the
Hill Country," commented Ken Waldrup, TAHC veterinarian and field
epidemiologist. "When our veterinarians inspected these imported elk, they
had no clinical signs
of CWD, which can include extreme weight loss, unusual behavior, excessive
salivation, weakness, and loss of body function."

Dr. Waldrup explained that the ranchers involved have excellent sale and
movement records, making epidemiology work much easier for the TAHC
veterinarians.  The 11 elk on the Panhandle ranch were imported from
Colorado prior to l998 or earlier,

Two had been killed, and two each had been transported to Pennsylvania and
Missouri. One had been returned to Colorado.  Because there is no
live-animal
test for CWD, the four Colorado-imports remaining on the ranch were euthanized
Friday, November 9, and their brain tissue was submitted to the National
Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa, for examination.  The
carcasses were incinerated as an extra biosecurity measure, Dr Waldrup said.

"We've also notified Pennsylvania and Missouri animals health officials, so
that they can locate the four Colorado animals that were transported to
their states," said Dr. Waldrup.  "While we await the report from NVSL
regarding the health status of the Colorado-imported elk, the other animals
in the Panhandle herd will be quarantined.  If disease is detected, we'll
take appropriate measures to cull and remove animals that may have been
exposed."

Dr. Waldrup said the Colorado elk taken to the Hill Country ranch also is
quarantined, along with its herd mates, while negotiations are finalized
for the purchase of the imported animal for testing.  "Federal CWD
indemnity funds are limited to $3,000 per animal, and since many of these
animals are worth much more, it is difficult to let go of an animal for
testing," he said. "This animal has been in Texas less than three months,
so there is little chance that this animal poses a threat to the rest of
its herd."

Dr. Logan explained that Colorado officials have required mandatory CWD
monitoring of farmed deer and elk herds in the state since May l998, due to
the incidence of the disease in wildlife in the northeastern corner of the
state.  The monitoring program involves testing animals that die,
regardless of the cause of death.

The TAHC offers a voluntary CWD monitoring program in Texas, encompassing
all cervids, including fallow and white-tailed deer. About 20 herds are
enrolled, added Dr. Waldrup. He said TAHC veterinarians are working with
staff from the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department to determine ways to
increase surveillance for Texas white-tailed deer raised under permit by
scientific breeders.

Dr. Logan said wildlife officials in Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska also
have collected brain samples for testing from hunter-killed animals in the
targeted "endemic area," involving a small portion of northeastern
Colorado, southeastern Wyoming and southwestern Nebraska. Hunters are
notified when an infected carcass is detected.  In Wyoming and Colorado,
less than one percent of the elk and less than five percent of the deer
have been found to be infected.  Two hunter-killed infected mule deer have
been detected in Nebraska.

"At this time, there is no evidence that CWD is transmissible to other hoof
stock, such as axis or fallow deer.  In the endemic area of Colorado, there
has been no evidence of spread to cattle, sheep or pronghorn antelope,"
said Dr. Waldrup. "Experiments and monitoring are continuing in the area,
so the veterinary and producer community can better understand this
disease, which was unknown until 1967, when it was first seen in a captive
wildlife research center in northeastern Colorado," he said.

Dr. Waldrup said that the first CWD-positive farmed elk herd was detected
in 1997 in South Dakota.  Since then, 16 other herds have been found: five
more in South Dakota; three in Nebraska, five in Colorado, and one each in
Oklahoma and Montana.  By late October 2001, 10 of these herds had been
depopulated, six remained quarantined, and one herd had been released from
quarantine after rigorous testing and surveillance revealed no further
evidence of disease. He said the disease also has been detected in several
farmed elk herds and free-ranging mule deer in the Canadian province of
Saskatchewan.

"All animal movement and trade entails a degree of risk," said Dr. Logan.
"Besides disease eradication, our main duty is to assess and reduce risks
to our state's herds and flocks. We cannot construct a fence around Texas,
but we can set realistic standards, testing and monitoring requirements for
imported animals.  After Colorado officials complete the epidemiological
work on these herds, the TAHC commissioners may want to revisit the issue
of the prohibition on Colorado deer and elk imports in a year or more."


 

DISCLAIMER

GoatGateway.com and it's agents and sponsors are not responsible for the content of advertisers' sites or advertised claims.

GoatGateway.com does not act as an agent for buyers or sellers. GoatGateway.com does not in any way influence or control transactions for goods or services between buyers and sellers.

USE

Information on this web site is offered by persons who are NOT veterinary professionals except where noted.
The information contained on this web site is based on the knowledge and understanding of the author at the time of first publication. However, because of advances in agriculture related fields, users are reminded of their personal responsibility to ensure that information upon which they rely is up to date and to CHECK accuracy and currency of the information WITH YOUR VETERINARIAN for specific health and nutrition advice.

ALWAYS READ THE LABEL
Users of medical and chemical products must always read the label and strictly comply with directions on the label. Users are not absolved from compliance with the directions on the label by reason of any statement made, or omitted to be made, on this web site.

TRADEMARKS

The boergoats.com logo is a registered trademark of KLS Boer Goats.
The following are trademarks or service marks of KLS Boer Goats.

OnLine Show
GoatGateway
BoerGoats.com
MeatGoats.com
GoatClassifieds
ShowMeatGoats
ShowWethers.net
BoerGoat101.com
GoatBreeders.com
BoerGoats.comCHAT
The Show Wether Center
Where The Bucks Meet The Bucks
The Boer & Meat Goat Information Center