Current
Visitors
24
COVER PAGE
PREVIOUS
DISPLAY
 Related Articles

"I Don't Know Nuthin' 'Bout Birthin' No Babies!"

Editor's note: Although this article was first published on
boergoats.com during the 2001 kidding season I have added new information.
The copyrighted photo on this page is by Stephanie Morris, Valley Springs, California, USA.
Click Here for her complete photo article.

Doe kidding

Butterfly McQueen's line as Prissy in "Gone With The Wind" goes a long way toward describing a new goat owner's feelings the first time their high dollar doe gets ready to have babies. Goats are pretty good at doing this kidding thing all by themselves but you've gotta' wonder... "What if something goes wrong?". Preparation can, however, lead to a slightly more relaxed goat owner and will probably lead to a healthier doe and kids.

The first piece of information that comes in handy is the gestation period for goats. The average is 150 days. I've included the word "average" on purpose - the normal range is 149 to 152 days.
What this means to you as a goat breeder is that it's fairly important for you to remember when the doe was bred. With that bit of advance knowledge all you have to do is count 5 months, give or take a day or two, and you'll know when the kids are due. There is a gestation table in the Genetics/Breeding section of the boergoats.com Library.

First things, first...
The doe gets pregnant. Well, Duh!.
Write down the date and mark your calendar for the day that she's due.
Follow [This Link] to use the Gestation Calculator.

The feeding of pregnant does is covered in "Feeding Young Does", an article in the Feeding Goats section of the Library. Here is a link directly to the article:

Feeding Pregnant Does.

The preparatory medications for your future mamma should include C/D&T at 15 days before delivery accompanied by a good worming. Valbazen is NOT to be used on pregnant does - we know that it causes abortion in the first trimester and have never used it on a pregnant doe and probably will never try it on a pregnant doe.

OK, Lets get on with it... Select the following pages for more information:
The "Normal" delivery
Dystocia

 

DISCLAIMER

GoatGateway.com and it's agents and sponsors are not responsible for the content of advertisers' sites or advertised claims.

GoatGateway.com does not act as an agent for buyers or sellers. GoatGateway.com does not in any way influence or control transactions for goods or services between buyers and sellers.

USE

Information on this web site is offered by persons who are NOT veterinary professionals except where noted.
The information contained on this web site is based on the knowledge and understanding of the author at the time of first publication. However, because of advances in agriculture related fields, users are reminded of their personal responsibility to ensure that information upon which they rely is up to date and to CHECK accuracy and currency of the information WITH YOUR VETERINARIAN for specific health and nutrition advice.

ALWAYS READ THE LABEL
Users of medical and chemical products must always read the label and strictly comply with directions on the label. Users are not absolved from compliance with the directions on the label by reason of any statement made, or omitted to be made, on this web site.

TRADEMARKS

The boergoats.com logo is a registered trademark of KLS Boer Goats.
The following are trademarks or service marks of KLS Boer Goats.

OnLine Show
GoatGateway
BoerGoats.com
MeatGoats.com
GoatClassifieds
ShowMeatGoats
ShowWethers.net
BoerGoat101.com
GoatBreeders.com
BoerGoats.comCHAT
The Show Wether Center
Where The Bucks Meet The Bucks
The Boer & Meat Goat Information Center