Current
Visitors
25
COVER PAGE
PREVIOUS
DISPLAY
 Related Articles
7MFARM.COM
AVOIDING VACCINATION KNOTS
B S E IN A FRENCH GOAT?
B S E UPDATE 2006-01-23
BACK TO BASICS ~ VACCINATIONS
BIO - AGENT PARASITE CONTROL
BLOAT
CAE
CAE - NEW TEST
CASEOUS LYMPHADENITIS (CL)
CASTRATING
CATTLE TB
CHLAMYDIA ABORTION
CL - CONFIRMED
CL - WHAT & HOW
COMMON DISEASES
CUT-N-TACKUP IN THE BARN
DIARRHEA
DRAWING A GOAT'S BLOOD
EXTERNAL PARASITES
F A T G O A T S
FALL BREEDING
FIXING FOLDED EARS
FLOPPY KID SYNDROME
FMD INFORMATION
GAMBLING ON THE MARKET
GOAT MEDICINES
GONE FISHING
HOOF ROT
HOOF TRIMMING
JOHNE'S DISEASE CHROMOSOMES
KEEP IT CLEAN - DISINFECTANTS
LISTERIOSIS FACT SHEET
LIVESTOCK STRESS
MAXIMIZING VACCINE BENEFITS
MEAT GOAT HOME STUDY COURSE ANNOUNCED BY PENN STATE
MED EQUIPMENT
MEXICAN CATTLE WATCH!
MORE B S E TESTING
NORTH AMERICAN BSE CONFERENCE
OFF LABLE USE OF ANIMAL MEDICATIONS
ORF - SOREMOUTH
OUR GOATS' WORST ENEMY
PLANT POISIONING
POISONOUS PLANTS
Q FEVER
QUARANTINE - DEER & ELK
QUARTERLY SHEEP & GOAT HEALTH REPORT
RECOGNIZING SOREMOUTH
REPORT ANIMAL HEALTH PROBLEMS
SCRAPIE - TEXAS PROPOSED RULE
SELENIUM MAP(SAANENDOAH.COM)
SHEEP & GOAT HEALTH REPORT
SWINE INFLUENZA INFORMATION
TAHC EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS
TAHC PRESS RELEASE - ANTHRAX
TAHC PRESS RELEASE - FMD
TAKE CARE OF THE LGDS
TB BULL - TAHC ASKS FOR HELP!
TEXAS SCRAPIE REQUIREMENTS
TICK FEVER QUARANTINE
UNRINARY CALCULI - WORST ENEMY
URINARY CALCULI
V S CONFIRMED IN TEXAS
VACCINATION
VACCINATION FAILURE
VACCINE HANDLING
VACCINE QUALITY ASSURANCE
VACCINE STORAGE
WHAT IS FAMACHA?
WHAT IS M U M S ?
WINTER MANAGEMENT
WYOMING TO TEXAS HAULING
Hoof Rot (Foot Rot)
By Keith Smith

The first sign of hoof rot is usually lameness; the goat is limping or holding the hoof off of the ground while standing. Many time more than one hoof on an animal will be infected. Inspection of the hoof will show separation of the horny portions of the hoof from the soft tissue. When the horny surface is trimmed away you will notice a foul-smelling paste in the area.

Causes
      

The bacteria that causes hoof rot (Bacteroides nodosus and Fusobacterium necophorum) work together to cause hoof rot and can be found in the ground just about anywhere goats are raised. These bacteria are anaerobic which means that they can live in free air for only a short time. Wet, muddy ground is a particularly good place for the bacteria to hide.

Insufficient zinc in the diet can result in deformed hooves which crack and provide bacteria a way to enter the hoof.

Overgrown hooves will allow the horny surface to curl inward over the sole of the hoof. This provides an excellent area for bacteria to grow. Routine hoof trimming is vital. My article on hoof trimming will be displayed at the end of this article.

Some breeding lines have a higher rate of hoof problems than others. Include the ancestors' hoof health in your evaluation criteria for prospective purchases.

Treatment
      

Individuals with hoof rot
Remove any foreign objects such as nails, small pebbles, etc., from the hoof. Pay particular attention to the space between the horny surface and the soft tissue.
Perform a complete hoof trimming then trim away any horny "toe nail" from the affected area. Thoroughly clean the area to remove all traces of the "pus". Consult your vet for their recommendation of medication. Some vets will advise penicillin or oxy-tet injections while others feel that topical (direct) medication such as Kopertox®, merthiolate, or mercurichrom applied to the infected area is better or perhaps should be administered at the same time as the injectable medication.
Quarantine the infected goat. It's ok to keep a group of goats together that have the same disease - just don't let them out with the rest of the herd and don't let "clean" animals in with them.

The rest of the herd
A preventive measure that seems to work is the use of a daily footbath of zinc sulfate. Mix 8 pounds of fine zinc sulfate with 10 gallons of water. Stir in 1 cup of laundry or dish soap to reduce the surface tension of foreign matter on the hooves and allow it to fall off more easily. For large number of animals you will need to increase the amount of each ingredient proportionately.
Set it up so the herd has to pass through the footbath to get to feed or water. They will be reluctant initially to walk through it but quickly adapt. The solution must be replenished and changed periodically. Good quality drinking water and salt must be made available so the goats are not forced to drink the foot bath solution.
Replenish or replace the solution as needed.

Hoof rot is expensive in the form of increased labor and in money. Animals that cannot walk correctly because of hoof rot will not grow as well as their herd mates and have a decreased value to you as a breeder and to prospective meat market buyers. Such animals will also have a hard time escaping predators. Does will have difficulty standing to be bred and bucks may not be able to mount the doe if a rear hoof is badly infected.


Hoof Trimming 101
by
Keith Smith

The goal of hoof trimming is to allow your goat to walk normal. If the nails are allowed to grow excessively long your goat will not be able to walk efficiently or correctly. There is an increased risk of hoof rot and other infectious diseases. If it can't get to the feed trough before all the food is gone it will be malnurished and other goats will get more than they should. If it can't run well it is at increased risk from predators (goats are only about 50 foot runners anyway but that's another article).

This is not an article on show trimming. This is the bare minimum we feel is necessary for our "field" goats. Show trimming involves more attention to detail and must be performed much more often.


Tools The first thing to consider is your selection of tools.
    From left to right are
  • Rasp - used to flatten the bottom of the hoof after trimming. The raised end, at the bottom in this photo, rests in the palm of your hand. There is a slight indentation in the top of the other end where your forefinger and middle finger sit. The tool is operated by pressing it down and forward, toward the end with your fingers.
  • Trimmers - select a sharp pair. We use the "orange" handle ones from Caprine Supply.
  • Knife - a *very* sharp knife. Works well in reaching those areas your trimmers can't get to. Also good for flattening the sole and for removing embedded rocks and thorns.
  • Brush - it helps if you brush off the junk so you can see what you're doing.
  • Blood Stop Powder - If you're careful and lucky you won't need this.

First, remove any dirt from the outside of the hoof and the dig dirt, mud, and nanny berries from the bottom of the hoof. A good tool for this is a hoof pick (not shown) or a nail. You can use the tips of your trimmer but by doing so you'll cut their life in about 1/3.
Hoof trimming takes time and is physically stressful for both you and the goat. It's very important that a comfortable position is established. We prefer having the goat secured on a fitting stand or other raised platform (though in my younger more flexible days I sometimes left the goat on the ground and just clipped it to a fence). Fitting Stand

First trin the toe The first cut on a badly overgrown foot like this one is to nip away the front of the nail. This makes it easier to cut the sides of the nails by opening a slot for you to fit the trimmers into.


Once the front tip of the nail is removed it's easy to insert the trimmers to cut the sides of the nail. You only need to cut it back even with the sole (also called the "frog") at this point. Trim the nail

Continue to trim the sides around one toe and then across the heel. Repeat the process on the other toe.

The frog and heel can be trimmed flat with either a knife or the rasp. When using the knife cut from the toe toward the heel. When using the rasp go from the heel to the toe.
This is the point where you might need the blood stop powder. Depends on how deep you go with the knife. Trim off a very thin slice with each stroke - a good rule is to stop when you see pink. Same thing goes for the rasp.
We stopped before we got this hoof completely flat. Note the dark brown areas on the sole.

The nail, sole, and heel have been trimmed parallel with the growth bands around the outside of the hoof and we were seeing pink on the sole. We'll come back in a couple of weeks and use the rasp and/or knife to finish the flatening process.

Keith & Lucinda Smith are retired Boer goat breeders and now operate the Internet Boer goat magazine www.BoerGoats.com

 

DISCLAIMER

GoatGateway.com and it's agents and sponsors are not responsible for the content of advertisers' sites or advertised claims.

GoatGateway.com does not act as an agent for buyers or sellers. GoatGateway.com does not in any way influence or control transactions for goods or services between buyers and sellers.

USE

Information on this web site is offered by persons who are NOT veterinary professionals except where noted.
The information contained on this web site is based on the knowledge and understanding of the author at the time of first publication. However, because of advances in agriculture related fields, users are reminded of their personal responsibility to ensure that information upon which they rely is up to date and to CHECK accuracy and currency of the information WITH YOUR VETERINARIAN for specific health and nutrition advice.

ALWAYS READ THE LABEL
Users of medical and chemical products must always read the label and strictly comply with directions on the label. Users are not absolved from compliance with the directions on the label by reason of any statement made, or omitted to be made, on this web site.

TRADEMARKS

The boergoats.com logo is a registered trademark of KLS Boer Goats.
The following are trademarks or service marks of KLS Boer Goats.

OnLine Show
GoatGateway
BoerGoats.com
MeatGoats.com
GoatClassifieds
ShowMeatGoats
ShowWethers.net
BoerGoat101.com
GoatBreeders.com
BoerGoats.comCHAT
The Show Wether Center
Where The Bucks Meet The Bucks
The Boer & Meat Goat Information Center