Current
Visitors
12
COVER PAGE
PREVIOUS
DISPLAY
 Related Articles
7MFARM.COM
AVOIDING VACCINATION KNOTS
B S E IN A FRENCH GOAT?
B S E UPDATE 2006-01-23
BACK TO BASICS ~ VACCINATIONS
BIO - AGENT PARASITE CONTROL
BLOAT
CAE
CAE - NEW TEST
CASEOUS LYMPHADENITIS (CL)
CASTRATING
CATTLE TB
CHLAMYDIA ABORTION
CL - CONFIRMED
CL - WHAT & HOW
COMMON DISEASES
CUT-N-TACKUP IN THE BARN
DIARRHEA
DRAWING A GOAT'S BLOOD
EXTERNAL PARASITES
F A T G O A T S
FALL BREEDING
FIXING FOLDED EARS
FLOPPY KID SYNDROME
FMD INFORMATION
GAMBLING ON THE MARKET
GOAT MEDICINES
GONE FISHING
HOOF ROT
HOOF TRIMMING
JOHNE'S DISEASE CHROMOSOMES
KEEP IT CLEAN - DISINFECTANTS
LISTERIOSIS FACT SHEET
LIVESTOCK STRESS
MAXIMIZING VACCINE BENEFITS
MEAT GOAT HOME STUDY COURSE ANNOUNCED BY PENN STATE
MED EQUIPMENT
MEXICAN CATTLE WATCH!
MORE B S E TESTING
NORTH AMERICAN BSE CONFERENCE
OFF LABLE USE OF ANIMAL MEDICATIONS
ORF - SOREMOUTH
OUR GOATS' WORST ENEMY
PLANT POISIONING
POISONOUS PLANTS
Q FEVER
QUARANTINE - DEER & ELK
QUARTERLY SHEEP & GOAT HEALTH REPORT
RECOGNIZING SOREMOUTH
REPORT ANIMAL HEALTH PROBLEMS
SCRAPIE - TEXAS PROPOSED RULE
SELENIUM MAP(SAANENDOAH.COM)
SHEEP & GOAT HEALTH REPORT
SWINE INFLUENZA INFORMATION
TAHC EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS
TAHC PRESS RELEASE - ANTHRAX
TAHC PRESS RELEASE - FMD
TAKE CARE OF THE LGDS
TB BULL - TAHC ASKS FOR HELP!
TEXAS SCRAPIE REQUIREMENTS
TICK FEVER QUARANTINE
UNRINARY CALCULI - WORST ENEMY
URINARY CALCULI
V S CONFIRMED IN TEXAS
VACCINATION
VACCINATION FAILURE
VACCINE HANDLING
VACCINE QUALITY ASSURANCE
VACCINE STORAGE
WHAT IS FAMACHA?
WHAT IS M U M S ?
WINTER MANAGEMENT
WYOMING TO TEXAS HAULING
OUR GOATS' WORST ENEMY
by Marvin Shurley
first published in Goat Rancher Magazine, May 2006

As the goat industry has grown here in the U.S. expansion has taken place in almost every state including Alaska and Hawaii. In reading articles about production, management and breeds, one thing has become apparent; we (producers) are our goat’s worst enemies. We simply love them too much. A prime example is the Boer goat, which was developed as a breed in the Republic of South Africa. The climate there ranges from semi-arid to sub-tropical (high rainfall) areas and the breed prospers across this country.

Our U.S. Boers though have as a whole been ruined by our constant intervention and over-management of them. We have taken a hardy, tough, breed of goat and turned them largely into pets that have a tough time making it in many climatic regions. This is due to over-management and saving every kid born due to the prospect of great financial return. I myself am guilty having bragged in years past of a 320% kidding rate with a 270% kid crop weaned. What we have to ask is at what cost to the breed?

This especially when we take into account they were developed to be some kind of tough, along with the fact many of the first Boers came from New Zealand, the same place the Kiko breed was developed. When we take this into account it forces us to look hard at our management and what we’ve done to the Boer goat.

Look at how many years “brush goats” have lived in the Southeast with little human intervention and prospered while doing so. Then we look at the Kiko breed that was developed with stringent culling criteria and seems to do well in this region as well.

And yet at the recent Alabama Goat Conference Dr. Mobini from Fort Valley state University in Georgia commented that even within the Kiko breed there are individual goats that seemed more susceptible to internal parasites. This is where breeders, regardless of the breed they raise, stand to benefit from strategic de-worming using the FAMACHA system. This systems incorporation into a management system allows for identification and culling of parasite susceptible individual animals no matter what breed. As was addressed in (the April, 2006) Goat Rancher by Mr. Paul Turner, adopting a tough love approach towards our goat herd is what it takes to make it profitable.

This requires committed breeder efforts and stringent culling just as was used by Garric Batten when starting up the Kiko breed. As was mentioned in (the April, 2006) Goat Rancher by Mr. Jeff Crawford, breeding for what he needed would have taken several generations so he went from Boers to Kikos for a quick fix. Then towards the end of his article he mentions a Boer doe about which he states, “On our farm, the most fabulous animal that has ever lived is a 100% registered Boer nannie”.

A good example of how genetic selection can impact a breed can be found once again coming from the country of New Zealand. After countless years of trimming hoofs and trying differing types of mechanical invention to trim hoofs, they finally incorporated into their breed standards a segment governing hoof growth patterns. Through genetic selection they developed Angora goats that no longer require hoofs to be trimmed. This is just an example of what genetic selection can accomplish for a breed. Here in the U.S. the goat industry is still undergoing growing pains with what could be considered unsuitable animals being sold as breeding stock. My first Boer goats required more feed, worming, and hoof trimming than those now produced, but it has been a thirteen-year venture to get to where I’m at today. And I have to say I’ve not yet quite gotten my herd to where I want it to be in terms of what could be considered a “hands off’ herd who can completely take care of themselves. The bright side is hoof trimming, worming and disease treatment has almost been eliminated within the herd. Hopefully three more generations and I’ll have the type of goat I really want, which is fast growing, tough, hardy animals who need minimum attention. Until then though, I’m still fighting the same problems many of you are. Luckily due to the short generation interval genetic advancement is achieved faster with goats than most other livestock species and they can be made into what fits your purposes with perseverance and patience, so don’t lose faith. Having faith in the American farmer I know that when it comes to development of these “hands off” goats I know we as an industry can “Get-er-done” with any breed we choose to focus on.


 

DISCLAIMER

GoatGateway.com and it's agents and sponsors are not responsible for the content of advertisers' sites or advertised claims.

GoatGateway.com does not act as an agent for buyers or sellers. GoatGateway.com does not in any way influence or control transactions for goods or services between buyers and sellers.

USE

Information on this web site is offered by persons who are NOT veterinary professionals except where noted.
The information contained on this web site is based on the knowledge and understanding of the author at the time of first publication. However, because of advances in agriculture related fields, users are reminded of their personal responsibility to ensure that information upon which they rely is up to date and to CHECK accuracy and currency of the information WITH YOUR VETERINARIAN for specific health and nutrition advice.

ALWAYS READ THE LABEL
Users of medical and chemical products must always read the label and strictly comply with directions on the label. Users are not absolved from compliance with the directions on the label by reason of any statement made, or omitted to be made, on this web site.

TRADEMARKS

The boergoats.com logo is a registered trademark of KLS Boer Goats.
The following are trademarks or service marks of KLS Boer Goats.

OnLine Show
GoatGateway
BoerGoats.com
MeatGoats.com
GoatClassifieds
ShowMeatGoats
ShowWethers.net
BoerGoat101.com
GoatBreeders.com
BoerGoats.comCHAT
The Show Wether Center
Where The Bucks Meet The Bucks
The Boer & Meat Goat Information Center